Increase your child’s word power for reading and writing.

What’s the secret behind trying to master reading and writing? Word power! Words Their Way Classroom immerses your child in fun, daily word-building activities that take just 15 minutes. The activities are game-like, multilevel, and absorbing. Children sort and categorize letters by sound, pattern, and meaning using hands-on cards and interactive online word sorts. Word sorting helps children see similarities and differences between vowel sounds, consonants, and word features. It gets students to analyze words in a deeper way than memorizing spelling words. That’s why Words Their Way Classroom has been a teacher favorite for almost 20 years.

Our #1 word study program!
Now improved and enhanced.

 
 
 

Watch the video to see it in action

 

Words Their Way Bundle

Homeschool Bundle Details

The bundle includes:

  • 8 consumable Word Study Notebooks for homeschooling your child from Grades K-5.
  • Teacher Resource Guide
  • Implementation Guide
  • 6-year access to the Pearson Realize™ digital platform

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Build your child’s word knowledge.
(Rather than rely on rote memorization!)

  • Daily word-building activities take just 15 minutes
  • Develop foundational skills for reading and writing
  • Hands-on cards and online interactives – fun and engaging!
  • Sort words by sound/alphabet, pattern, and meaning
  • Help your child analyze words in a deeper way
  • A diagnostic assessment to help you place your child in the correct developmental levels
  • Add to any homeschool literacy program

See Program Overview

word-building activities

 

What is word sorting?

Word sorting is the process of grouping sounds, words, and pictures into specific categories. It’s the heart of Words Their Way Classroom. Here’s an example. Words spelled with -op like top, pop, and hop are compared with words spelled with -ot like hot, cot, or pot. 

Try a Sort!

Letter Name

Syllables and Affixes

 
 

Shane Templeton


“The importance of word study in developing knowledge of spelling-to-sound and sound-to-spelling relationships is paramount in the early school years.”

–Shane Templeton, Ph.D., Coauthor